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The 1031 Exchange Hybrid Solution - Combining Forward and Reverse Exchanges

An increasing number of exchangers are structuring their transactions as 1031 reverse exchanges, wherein the taxpayer first arranges for the acquisition of the replacement property and later sells their relinquished property. But there is a hybrid solution that often is overlooked – this is a combination forward-reverse exchange.
1031 Exchange Hybrid Solution Forward and Reverse Exchanges

Most Section 1031 Refers to the "nature or character" of the property and not to its "grade or quality." That is, real property held for investment or the productive use in a trade or business may generally be exchanged on a tax-deferred basis for other real property. Personal property held for investment or the productive use in a trade or business may generally be exchanged on a tax-deferred basis for other personal property, provided the personal property is of "like kind" or "like class." Professional tax advice should be obtained when planning exchanges. Like-Kind Exchange transactions involve a taxpayer who sells a relinquished property and then acquires a replacement property within the appropriate guidelines. An increasing number of exchangers are structuring their transactions as 1031 reverse exchanges, wherein the taxpayer first arranges for the acquisition of the replacement property and later sells their relinquished property. But there is a hybrid solution that often is overlooked – this is a combination forward-reverse exchange.

The Situation

Karen currently owns a small strip center and has received an attractive offer to sell the property for $500,000. She also has a small office building she is trying to sell, also worth about $500,000. She was planning to sell both properties and combine the proceeds to acquire replacement property worth at least $1,000,000.

The Problem

Karen’s small strip center will close in about 45 days, but she has not yet received any offers on the office building. The fact that she has identified a suitable replacement property for which the seller has agreed to accept $1,000,000 if she can close in 60 days further complicates matters. With the office building being under contract and not yet the subject of negotiations, she is worried about how to accomplish her 1031 exchange goals.

The Solution: A Combination Forward-Reverse Hybrid 1031 Exchange

Karen will structure the sale of her small strip center as part of a Section 1031 Like-Kind Exchange. After consultation with her attorney and Accruit as the Qualified A person acting to facilitate an exchange under section 1031 and the regulations. This person may not be the taxpayer or a disqualified person. Section 1.1031(k)-1(g)(4)(iii) requires that, for an intermediary to be a qualified intermediary, the intermediary must enter into a written "exchange" agreement with the taxpayer and, as required by the exchange agreement, acquire the relinquished property from the taxpayer, transfer the relinquished property, acquire the replacement property, and transfer the replacement property to the taxpayer. Intermediary (“QI”), Karen understands both the forward 1031 exchange and reverse 1031 exchanges process.

The sale of the strip center took place on March 1, 2021, and the exchange proceeds were sent directly to Accruit, the qualified intermediary, to be held on her behalf until the purchase of her replacement property. This is necessary because a taxpayer participating in a like-kind exchange cannot be in actual or constructive receipt of the net sale proceeds while the exchange is pending.

Within 45 days after the closing on the sale, Karen identified a one-half interest in her target replacement property using Identification Rules in 1031 Exchanges. Karen also worked closely with the qualified intermediary, Accruit, to begin the reverse exchange component of her transaction. Accruit, through its affiliate, known as an Also referred to as an "EAT", is typically a special purpose, limited-liability company that is used to own the legal title to property that is being parked as part of a reverse exchange. An exchange accommodation titleholder may not be a disqualified person. Exchange Accommodation Titleholder (“EAT”) will take title to the other one-half interest in Karen’s target replacement property.

Specifically, Karen will lend the additional $500,000 to a new LLC (let us call it Newco LLC), with the EAT as its sole member, which was established specifically for the purpose of facilitating the reverse 1031 exchange. The loan from Karen to Newco LLC will be documented by a note and secured with a pledge of the EAT’s membership interest in Newco LLC.

Karen ultimately closes on the acquisition of the target replacement property on April 30, 2021, with title vested 50% in her personal name and 50% in Newco LLC, as tenants in common. (Learn more about Tenants in Common.) On June 1, 2021, while the replacement property is held by Karen and Newco, Karen enters a contract to sell the small office building, her second relinquished property, for $540,000, with a closing date of August 20, 2021. At closing, after all closing costs are paid, the net proceeds of $500,000 will be deposited into Karen’s exchange account with Accruit. Karen will acquire the remaining 50% tenancy in common interest from the EAT and will direct Accruit to transfer the funds from the exchange account to the closing agent for this portion of the transaction.  Immediately Upon receipt of those funds the EAT will direct the closing agent to remit that sum to Karen to pay off the loan that was made to the EAT to acquire the new property. Upon payoff of the $500,000 loan owed to Karen, Karen receives full ownership of the replacement property.  In this manner it is the same as if Karen had acquired the replacement property outright from seller.

The Result

Karen used the forward exchange for the sale of the strip center and the reverse exchange for the sale of the office building to ultimately acquire 100% of the new building, deferring the taxes on both sales in the process. In doing so, Karen exchanged from two properties worth approximately $1,000,000 into a single, more desirable building worth about the same.

Accruit is a Internal Revenue Code Section 1031 states that "no gain or loss shall be recognized on the exchange of property held for productive use in a trade or business or for investment if such property is exchanged solely for property of like kind which is to be held for productive use in a trade or business or for investment." 1031 Exchange Qualified Intermediary and facilitates 1031 exchanges nationwide. Always consult your CPA or tax advisor for advice pertaining to your specific tax situation. For more information, visit https://www.accruit.com/ or call (800) 237-1031.


 

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